Community Leaders

Numerous other business and professional leaders are buried at Hollywood. Although architect Reuben A. Heavner (died 1940) [Section M, Lot 53] left buildings such as the Southern Hotel in Jackson as his legacy, his burial in Hollywood Cemetery is worth noting.

Photo by Cristie Wright

Clarence E. Pigford (died 1945) [Section B, Lot 93], was a “lawyer, publisher of the Jackson Sun and influential public spirited citizen.”

Photo by Cristie Wright

Wholesale grocer Robert S. Fletcher (died 1931) [Section I, Lot 82] also edited the Jackson Dispatch and later co-owned the West Tennessee Whig.

Photo by Cristie Wright

For many years farming played a dominant role in the economy of Madison County and a number of Exum families were a part of the farming community. Martin Van Buren Exum (died 1918) [Section H Lot 50] was active in several aspects of the business community while operating a farm in the Carrol Community. He played a major role in the decision to locate what was to become the West Tennessee Experiment Station in Madison County, he served as a Democratic State Representative in the 52nd General Assembly, he was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and as a member of the County Court. During the Civil War he served as a private in Cheatham’s Brigade of Tennessee Volunteers. On December 7, 1875, Martin Van Buren married Sarah Moore (died 1953) [Section H Lot 50].

Photo by Cristie Wright

 

Photo by Cristie Wright

In 1915 The city of Jackson changed the form of government from an aldermanic form to a mayor and commissioner form. Four years later Thomas H. Campbell (died 1925) [Section H Lot 50] was elected to a four year term as the Commissioner of Education. He was elected to a second four year term in 1923 but this term ended in 1925 when he died from appendicitis. On October 2, 1907, Thomas married Allie (Al) Florence Exum (died 1973) [Section H Lot 50], the daughter of Martin Van Buren Exum.

Photo by Cristie Wright

Photo by Cristie Wright

The presence of such a large number (at least twenty-six) of local, state, and national politicians in Hollywood emphasizes not only West Tennessee’s traditional post-bellum Democratic Party political strength, but also the cemetery’s appeal to prominent people.

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